The Mayflower Compact, originally titled Agreement Between the Settlers of New Plymouth, was the first government document of the Plymouth colony. It was written by the male passengers of the Mayflowers, composed of separatist Puritans, adventurers and traders. The Puritans fled the religious persecutions of King James I of England. It is unlikely, as Mack notes, that Hopkins aboard the Mayflower caused the same kind of problems as in Bermuda, for this time he was traveling with his family and servants and had a considerable interest in making the colony a success. The first possibility regarding distrust of separatists and lack of cohesion among foreigners is more likely, but the most likely is the objection that Martin will continue to become governor of the colony. When the Sea Venture was destroyed in Bermuda, Gates and Somers could assert authority as members of the upper class, but Martin was not the social superior of anyone on board and by all the haughty, rude and unreliable reports. The Mayflower Pact – as it is known today – was signed on 11 November 1620 by these 41 “real” pilgrims and became the first government document of Plymouth Colony. The pact they signed was an event of the utmost importance. It was the foundation of freedom based on law and order, and that tradition has been perpetuated. They devised a form of government that has been called the first true constitution of modern times. It was democratic to recognize freedom according to law and order and to give everyone the right to participate in government while promising to obey the laws. But what was really wonderful was that they had the strength and strength of character to stick to it and live from that day on.

Some governments are better than others. But any form of government is better than anarchy, and any attempt to destroy government is an attempt to destroy civilization. [16] Members of the separatist community, as well as a number of unknown individuals, apparently understood that they would not survive if they did not all work together for the common good. The pact provided that the signatories would accept a democratic regime for the colony, in which officials were to be elected and laws passed in the interest of all. . . .